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  1. #1
    Junior Member Rickovski is on a distinguished road
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    AC1750 EAP245 needing comnpatible 8 port switch with POE

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    Hi I am trying to find a suitable 8 port switch to provide POE to my AC1750 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Ceiling Mount Access Point EAP245 but all the devices I can find are IEEE 802.3af not IEEE 802.3at as stated on the spec of the access point. My question is do I need IEEE 802.3at or will IEEE 802.3af work just as well to power the device as I am only using it to extend the wifi upstairs at home as the BB router/modem from Virgin is shocking and don't really want to install a totally over the top 24 port rack mounted switch?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    The EAP245 consumes max 12.7 watts. Max. power for 802.3af is about 12.5 to 12.96 watts depending on the cable length. Therefore you should better use 802.3at, although it could probably work with 802.3af over a short cable, too. I would recommend http://www.tp-link.com/us/products/d...-SG1008PE.html, which is an eight-port PoE+ switch. This way you have a reserve for a second EAP or any other device which supports PoE.

  3. #3
    Just realized the EAP245 isn't compatible with the TL-SG108PE I intended on purchasing.
    The TL-SG1008PE could indeed be a solution, but this is unfortunately at a completely different price point (more than twice the price)...
    Not seeing a PoE+ injector from TP-Link out there :-/
    Do you reckon D-Link's DPE-301GI could do the trick, or am I risking some other incompatibilty issue ?

  4. #4
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windar View Post
    Do you reckon D-Link's DPE-301GI could do the trick, or am I risking some other incompatibilty issue ?
    Any 802.3at switch would fit. Just make sure that the total power capacity supplied by the switch matches the power requirements of 8x EAP245, e.g. 8x 12.7W = 101.6W requires a switch with a total PoE power capacity of at least 112W to 118W (allow for 10%-15% reserve).

    As for the D-Link switch check its data sheet. Note that even if the PoE+ switch supports PoE on all ports, it might allow only for some ports to be used at full power capacity until total power capacity of the switch is reached. For example: although each port has up to 30W power capacity on the PoE+ switch TL-SG1008PE, total power capacity is 124W for all devices connected to it, not 8x 30W = 240W.
    Last edited by R1D2; 09-23-2017 at 08:25.

  5. #5
    The DPE-301GI is a PoE+ injector, it's said to support 802.3af and 802.3at, so there's no reason it shouldn't work.
    I already own TP-Link's PoE injector (TL-POE150S), so I might still try it out on an EAP245 just in case it is sufficient (I've seen there's another thread discussing this).
    TP-Link should maybe consider making a PoE+ (802.3af & 802.3at compatible) injector of their own.
    Last edited by Windar; 09-25-2017 at 07:57. Reason: missing word

  6. #6
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windar View Post
    The DPE-301GI is a PoE+ injector, it's said to support 802.3af and 802.3at, so there's no reason it shouldn't work.
    Yes, it surely works if it supports 802.3at.

    I already own TP-Link's PoE injector (TL-POE150S), so I might still try it out on an EAP245 just in case it is sufficient (I've seen there's another thread discussing this).
    The EAP might start up, but that's no guarantee that it still works if the CPU is under more load or if the WiFi adapter is running at maximum performance, both situations leading to the device drawing more current. Although PoE 802.3af specifies 15.4 watts max. power, depending on cable length and quality it could actually deliver only ~11.5 to 12.5 watts at the PD's site (that's even still conforming to the IEEE 802.3af standard).

    There is also some confusion caused by contradictory specifications on - at least the german - website of TP-Link for the EAP245: in the functions section the site claims 802.3af would be enough, while in the specifications section it correctly states that the EAP245 requires 802.3at. I recommend to always consult the data sheet as the last instance if in doubt:

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    TP-Link should maybe consider making a PoE+ (802.3af & 802.3at compatible) injector of their own.


    Yes, I would buy this also for small EAP installations if such an injector would be available from TP-Link.
    Last edited by R1D2; 09-25-2017 at 18:13.


 

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