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  1. #1

    Tuning CPE510 Request

    Model :

    Hardware Version :

    Firmware Version :

    ISP : [/COLOR]

    I've setup my first link with the CPE510. I don't mind playing with it to try and dial it in, but could someone give a "best guess" or "educated guess" on what transmit power I should be targeting for this short link:

    0.11km rural USA, MCS1 27/30 Mbps. I suspect that 17dB power with this 13dBi antenna is overkill for this short of a connection. It is going through one wall. (I was lazy and didn't want to install my AP outside if I didn't have to.)

    The link is working great so far and I could just leave it, but if I could dial back the power and still have a good stable link, let me know what you think.

    I understand that the signal strength and SNR are going to vary based on a number environmental factors. What should I be looking for, ballpark wise?

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  2. #2
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Mount it outside to have free line of sight between the two CPEs in order to improve the signal strength which is somewhat low for 110m. Then reduce TX power to see whether SNR could be improved slightly. If it is just a PtP link, turn MAXtream off to improve speed somewhat.

  3. #3
    Someone told me the bigger the better. So just choose the maximum value.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ferrarigogo View Post
    Someone told me the bigger the better. So just choose the maximum value.
    Jajajajajajajaj ..... with due pardon for the sarcasm .... but before recommending something, I should first investigate how these devices work, and not throw a comment of that magnitude just by the fact that I "HEARD" or "SOMEONE TOLDME...


    With it will only get the friend who consults this information his head hurts ....


    Or what is the same .... I invite you to stick your head into the microwave oven ...

    Regards...
    Last edited by Victor Ramos; 08-08-2017 at 11:40.
    Victor A. Ramos M.
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  5. #5
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Ramos View Post
    Or what is the same .... I invite you to stick your head into the microwave oven ...
    LOL! No, don't do it. For the same reason why WiFi TX power is best reduced, but not to be increased to get ideal setups. Well said, Victor!

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  6. #6
    I fail to see why you opted for MCS1 (27/30mbps) in this particular case, perhaps there's reasoning behind it but if there's none and given that you're only ~100m apart I'd suggest that you restore it to mode15 in order for you to enjoy the full potential of the link (i.e. 300mbps airtime).

  7. #7
    I appreciate everyone's comments on the thread. I will move the antenna outside at some point in the next couple weeks. It is working very well for now. When I move it outside, I will look to see (before and after) how much the noise level drops. Thanks!

    I chose MCS1 for now because my internet bandwidth coming into my house is about 20-22 Megabit at best. Upload is around 10 to 16 megabit. I am giving the neighbor up to 16 Megabit down. (If his demand is high and my demand is high, then we will both get around 10 megabit because of how my router's QoS is configured which is fine by me). There was no point in going with a 300 megabit connection to his house right now. He could have 300 megabit to me, but he'll never get more than 16 Megabit, so why bother with a higher rate?

    I took the comment about "just choose the maximum value" as being tongue in cheek. I am new at this, but even I understand why that is not a good idea from a FCC perspective and from a noise / signal level perspective.

  8. #8
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by quarky42 View Post
    He could have 300 megabit to me, but he'll never get more than 16 Megabit, so why bother with a higher rate?
    Because of AirTime. To get data at 16 Mbit/s over the air, you need a wireless speed of up to 32 Mbit/s due to the encapsulation of packets in wireless frames and due to the nature of half-duplex transmission. So, with a 30 Mbit/s setting you are utilizing the AirTime (the time your CPE can allocate the radio channel) for nearly 100%. That's no problem as long as your neighbor doesn't send data when you transfer data to him, too, but it could slow down even more if other neighbors start to use the same radio channel. Anyway, if it works for you, there is no need to increase the wireless speed. OTOH, it doesn't hurt either.
    Last edited by R1D2; 08-10-2017 at 03:08.

  9. #9
    @R1D2 Thank you for the VERY informative reply! Truth be told, I didn't mention it in my last reply, but some days after my original post, I did bump my neighbor up to the 54/60 Mbit one (I believe MCS3). So it sounds like from that perspective it should be fine. I live in a very rural area. The trees behind my neighbors house aren't likely to be putting out any WiFi any time soon. On the other hand, if someone builds a house back there or conditions change, I think I have an idea of what to do and why thanks to your very kind reply. I appreciate people that take the time to teach! Thank you again.

  10. #10
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    You're welcome, quarky42.

    Quote Originally Posted by quarky42 View Post
    The trees behind my neighbors house aren't likely to be putting out any WiFi any time soon.
    Who knows for sure? Maybe, when no one is looking, they send out some weird signals, what probably could be the cause for the (still not well researched) higher interference on 5 GHz radio signals with the foliage of pine and oak trees compared to foliage of lime trees (just kidding).

  11. #11
    I think I read somewhere that if you install some speed holes in said trees, it allows the wifi through without any interference. About 20 or 30 holes per tree should do the trick. I hope you topped up your portable drill batteries.


 

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