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  1. #1

    Mixing network with two neighbours

    Model :

    Hardware Version :

    Firmware Version :

    ISP : [/COLOR]

    • Local cable provider
    • Router TP-Link TL-WR841N, gateway 192.168.0.1 with DHCP range .0.150 to 0.165 and some IPs reserved by MAC for Kodi and mySQL functions, WPA2 password. No MAC filtering.
    • PLC TP-LINK TL-WPA4226KIT version 1 (bought in 2015, no newer SW available), with no extension. So I have 2 WiFis.
    Hi all, I used this in a 1999 flat since last month, no problem, I plugged them in and we get full speed. When moving to a 1966 building, I started to have some issues, my PC connnected to the extensor sometimes didn't get IP, achieve very low speeds randomly... I was afraid of the wiring quality... but one day I entered the router and saw a DHCP client not identified... "oh, they broke my WPA2!!!" (I was wrong...)... later, my barebone PC connected via WiFi to the router gets no connection... it gets a 1.15 IP... "that's so strange!". Finally I noticed I was getting 1.XX IPs in all devices randomly, and when accessing the gateway 192.168.1.1... the navigator prompts me for identification... I used the default for the brand (devolo I think)... and "voilą" I can access now two different WiFi network from 2 of my neighbours! The speed is very poor (if any), and I don't like intruders in my network, so... what can I do?

    The issue is very strange, I understand why the new extended WiFi "TP-LINK_XXXXXX", (the "client") gives me a 1.XX IP (because some interference it is connected to another PLC "server" and this to another router and DHCP server)... but sometimes while I'm connected to the main WiFi, I also get a 1.XX IP !!!!! Why??!?!?!?

    My questions are:
    1. Is there a method to ensure that my PLC "client" ONLY connects with MY PLC "server" (and viceversa, not allowing any other PLC device to be served by MY "server").
    2. Is there any explanation on the issue that through my router sometimes gives me the IP of another router? Can a PLC "server" interfere in the DHCP in such way???
    Thank you all.

  2. #2
    When the PC is connected to the WR841N router, what is the gateway on the PC, it's 92.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1? Sometimes, if router detects there is IP conflicts betweent its WAN and LAN, its LAN Ip might change from 0.1 to 1.1 automatically. Confimed if that is the issue.
    For the PLC devices, check if their 2nd lights are still lit when problem happens. Normaly the 2 PLC units will not obtain IP address from router, they just bypassing the data, and the IP address which shown up in the tp-link utility( if you have installed one) is a virtaul IP. If needed you can reset and pair up the 2 PLC units again.

  3. #3
    The GW is 192.168.0.1 because I've somehow forced it (also, the IP is 192.168.0.160, reserved by mac in my router), because sometimes it was 192.168.1.1 (from one of mi neighbours router I assume).
    Even if I do this, suddenly the PC gets "low connectivity" and I lose all access to internet, to my router or to others router. The second light is fixed.

    I'm tired to repair them again and again... could a better router solve the problem (perhaps it han handle more connections or give an IP faster)? Or use another type of IP....

    Thank you!

  4. #4
    You simply need to set up your own PLC network with an individual password. Out of the box, the TP-Link kits all come with the default encryption key from the chip vendor. Yes that is stupid, and other vendors ship their two-adapter kits with an individually paired key.

    So, individual pairing it is. Pull all your PLC adapters from the wall. Plug one back in, near your router. Do a factory reset on that one (very long button press until the LEDs turn off). Once it comes back, press its button again for about one second to put it into pairing mode. Now plug your 2nd adapter into a nearby outlet, press its button for one second too. These two will now establish a PLC network with a new, randomly generated key. Do the one-second-press procedure for your remaining adapters, always pressing the button on an adapter in the network first, then plugging the new one and pressing its button too. Once done, deploy the adapters to their final location and enjoy your own private network.

  5. #5
    Do you live in a block of flats or similar? It would be unusual for Powerline signals to travel between building as powerline signals don't tend to be strong enough to cross the mains utility cables in your street....
    Last edited by The Vogon; 10-05-2017 at 17:58.

  6. #6
    Yes, it's a flats building built on 1966. I'm also speculating on increase the isolation of my electrical wires... but it's very weird for me that I catch IPs from other routers so often. Not only when the devices are connected trough the extended WiFi network created by the "client PLC", but also (and this is something very weird for me) when the devices are connected to the main router. Sometimes I have to unplug both PLCs to have connection :_(

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter M View Post
    You simply need to set up your own PLC network with an individual password. Out of the box, the TP-Link kits all come with the default encryption key from the chip vendor. Yes that is stupid, and other vendors ship their two-adapter kits with an individually paired key.

    So, individual pairing it is. Pull all your PLC adapters from the wall. Plug one back in, near your router. Do a factory reset on that one (very long button press until the LEDs turn off). Once it comes back, press its button again for about one second to put it into pairing mode. Now plug your 2nd adapter into a nearby outlet, press its button for one second too. These two will now establish a PLC network with a new, randomly generated key. Do the one-second-press procedure for your remaining adapters, always pressing the button on an adapter in the network first, then plugging the new one and pressing its button too. Once done, deploy the adapters to their final location and enjoy your own private network.
    I've already done this, first when I detected the problems and again after I read your post carefully to make sure I've done it right... no success. The PLC continues to chatch a different range IP from another router aproximately 40% of the times, and sometimes it loses connectivity after hours of being with right IP. Reserving and fixing manually the IP gives no success, somtimes it stats to connecting... identifying... and no conecction

    I have decided to give the PLC another chance (since a borrowed wifi extender also failed even more) by changing the router, I have a WR421 and perhaps it's too slow on giving my devices an IP. What's your opinion?
    I'm searching something around 100€ but I also want to hang it down the furniture "hanged tv console" and in that rage they are all to stand up and "visible".

    Thank you all for your ansers

  7. #7
    If your PLC network is properly encrypted with an individual key (either entered into tpPLC utility, or randomly generated via button press pairing), then your router won't be able to see your neighbours' devices, and neither will their router(s) see yours. This is what you need to solve.

  8. #8
    (the key is often generated from a "network name" field depending which vendor it is.

  9. #9
    Well, well, well. I'm very ashamed of myself but very proud to decide to tell the situation.
    First of all, I'm supposed to be an IT engineer, but hardware definitely is not my thing.

    Yes, my PLC keep on mixing with the neighbours, I tried to change the IP ranges, to block MAC adresses, I tried a WiFi extender, I exchanged one PLC module with a relative, I've posted here and there, I've read manuals, installed applications to monitor... asked my electrician to isolate my flat... but when you are somehow stupid or forgot elemental rues, you are lost. The pairing process work well, but all of this is pointless if, like me, you unplug the "client" PLC because you don't need it everyday or to save energy.
    Should PLC sold in pair be better paired from factory? Yes. A small watch battery to mantain the pairing could be a good idea... yes. But I've lost so many time, and worst of all, your time, because I assumed the pairing will be kept magically.

    I paired the two PLC modules, server and client, and keep them plugged. Now it works perfectly.

    Sorry to all of you.

  10. #10
    The network passkey _is_ maintained through a power loss. All PLC adapters work like that. If yours doesn't, then it's probably defective.


 

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