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  1. #16
    Appreciate the feedback.

    So if i summarize this is what im looking at.

    1) Keep the antenna where it is (works the best for me there)
    2) Get a 1-2 foot 400 lmr cable
    3) Install an access point with good output power to the antenna (or the same router jacked up to 251mw) in a weather proof enclosure (i have a spare pelican box i can use)
    4) Run power to the AP
    5) Run Eithernet (or i suppose i can go wireless but throughput goes down) to the AP
    6) Ground the antenna
    7) bobs your uncle.

    Still a bit worried about the heat generated inside the box. Roof tops here in texas can get over 140+ Any thoughts there or just assume minimized lifetime of the unit? If i select an AP with that sort of 400mw+ output to the antenna. Could i in theory go longer on the 400lmr cable from the ap to the antenna? If so i could in theory mount the box inside the houses' attic (which may be just as hot but out of the elements i could mount a fan to it or something?

    Sorry so many questions, really appreciate you hanging in there with me.

  2. #17
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    Yeah, I would not mount the AP in the attic at all since the heat would be extreme.The AP could be mounted on the chimney with a mount. As for a heat problem in the box I have no problems for one my enclosure is a bright white and it does not adsorb much sun light it has been running 24/7 since spring of 2013. The other members here have other solutions such the tp link CP series AP, but the built in antennas are directional, and I don't know your exact needs.I have installed alot of antennas on towers, and your main problem for wifi with that high antenna will be lightning storms. One nearby strike within 1/2 mile will damage the Access Point, the strike does not have to be a direct hit. So when storms do come I just power my unit down.
    Last edited by kevsh; 02-27-2017 at 03:12.

  3. #18
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    I agree with kevsh and would also not recommend to mount the AP in the attic if heat can go up to 140F. As for lightning, ESD and even rain or humidity any consumer-grade device made for indoor use only will be problematic, too.

    In one installation I had a Linksys WRT160 (the same device as on kevsh's photo) in the open, b/c of customer's demand and it did break just after a couple of months during coldness in winter. OTOH a Linksys WRT54 in my own attic survived somewhat longer, but there were no such extreme temperatures (~ 20 to 100F usually) and the WRT54 was a rock-solid device with shielded Ethernet ports, so it was grounded to protect against ESD, while the WRT160 has plastic ports w/o shielding.

    I switched to TP-Link's Professional Line of outdoor APs in early 2016. I have a CPE210, a CPE510 and a WBS210 with sector antenna on two locations. All devices did survive storms with heavy lightning ~1/4 mile away! Did not cause any problem so far. Having a temperature range from -22F to 158F they also kept on working in last winter's coldness. They use MIL-grade chips and weatherproof boxes, so no trouble anymore with the housing. I did wait for the EAP110-Outdoor for a year now (it was announced as OBS210 in TP-Link's product guide of early 2016) and it finally arrived on the market, although with EAP firmware instead of PharOS used in the WBS210. I will soon install them at customer's places needing omnidirectional 360 antennas.

    First photo shows two CPEs on a mast powered by one PoE power source looped through the second port from the first CPE to the second CPE. This photo was taken at the time of adjustment, they are now fixed in their positions and work flawlessly since then. Antenna beamwidth is 65 for the CPE210 (2.4 GHz) and 45 for the CPE510 (5 GHz). They are used for a PtP directional link to the other side of the valley, where a second CPE combination is used. But if the beamwidth and (much lower) distance would suffice, you could also use them in a PtMP setup with end-user devices.

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    Second photo is a WBS210 mounted to the TL-ANT2415MS sector antenna (beamwidth 120) in use as PtMP since last autumn, also working w/o any problem:

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    This is how I answered the questions in your post #16 which did arise for me as well long time ago.

    I still have external antennas with appropriate outdoor equipment (such as the older TL-WA7210 which has an external antenna plug) and lot of CFD-200 antenna cables for sale at eBay, but since it is EU gear it isn't suitable for use in the US.
    Last edited by R1D2; 02-27-2017 at 10:22.

  4. #19
    Seems i found a US vendor http://www.memorydepot.com/detail/EAP110-Outdoor.html So lets so i go this route, I can still get the 1-2foot (1 metre) and hook up the antenna i already have and mounted. How does the EAP-110 retrieve the inbound connection through the POE (i assume).

    Unfortunately we're a Wi-Max provider out here and in the attic is where they have their PoE the runs from the dish to our router. I would have to intercept that line (ethernet) at some point in the attic. What would be the best way? a small switch? Some other cool splinter POE or something?

  5. #20
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplegreen View Post
    Seems i found a US vendor http://www.memorydepot.com/detail/EAP110-Outdoor.html So lets so i go this route, I can still get the 1-2foot (1 metre) and hook up the antenna i already have and mounted. How does the EAP-110 retrieve the inbound connection through the POE (i assume).
    Connection is through data cable, PoE just means that power is supplied over the same cable. See page 6 of the Installation Guide for schematics (ignore that the IG is for the EU model, it's still the same for the US model):

    http://static.tp-link.com/EAP110-Outdoor(EU)_V1_IG_1479275525987w.pdf

    More information about the EAP110-Outdoor in english language can be found here:

    http://www.tp-link.com.au/products/d...0-Outdoor.html

    Unfortunately we're a Wi-Max provider out here and in the attic is where they have their PoE the runs from the dish to our router. I would have to intercept that line (ethernet) at some point in the attic. What would be the best way? a small switch? Some other cool splinter POE or something?
    You need to connect the EAP to your WiMAX router (LAN), not to the dish antenna. Suitable cable including a ground wire is the ToughCable from UBNT:

    https://www.ubnt.com/accessories/toughcable/
    Last edited by R1D2; 03-01-2017 at 12:09.

  6. #21
    Banned Ace_marlin is on a distinguished road
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    To hard for me........

  7. #22
    ok pulled the trigger bought the EAP110-Outdoor and a 3ft cable (more for the PoE and power issue than anything. Gonna combine the 15dbi antenna and hope i get better results. I assume im still keeping said antenna at a 45 degree angle on the roof?

  8. #23
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplegreen View Post
    Gonna combine the 15dbi antenna and hope i get better results.
    I would recommend to use the standard 2x2 MIMO antennas of EAP110-Outdoor. They perfectly fit to the WiFi chip of the device and cover a large area. No hassle with attenuation due to cables, connectors etc. Just mount the EAP-Outdoor somewhere on the mast or even a wall at least 2.40 meters / 7.8 feet high over ground.

    You should not use a 15dBi external antenna, b/c if cable loss is <= 5dBi you will achieve an antenna gain of 10dBi, which is 10 times the maximum allowed radiation and this could be troublesome. If cable loss is near to 10dBi, the 15dBi antenna will not perform any better, but you lose MIMO (would need two antennas mounted in correct distance to each other). If cable loss is > 10dBi, the antenna will even give worser results than the standard ones. Thus, with a 15dBi external antenna you will always have disadvantages no matter how it actually performs.

    However, you could use the 15dBi antenna as a mounting pole for the EAP.
    Last edited by R1D2; 03-06-2017 at 09:29.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    I would recommend to use the standard 2x2 MIMO antennas of EAP110-Outdoor. They perfectly fit to the WiFi chip of the device and cover a large area. No hassle with attenuation due to cables, connectors etc. Just mount the EAP-Outdoor somewhere on the mast or even a wall at least 2.40 meters / 7.8 feet high over ground.

    You should not use a 15dBi external antenna, b/c if cable loss is <= 5dBi you will achieve an antenna gain of 10dBi, which is 10 times the maximum allowed radiation and this could be troublesome. If cable loss is near to 10dBi, the 15dBi antenna will not perform any better, but you lose MIMO (would need two antennas mounted in correct distance to each other). If cable loss is > 10dBi, the antenna will even give worser results than the standard ones. Thus, with a 15dBi external antenna you will always have disadvantages no matter how it actually performs.

    However, you could use the 15dBi antenna as a mounting pole for the EAP.
    Yeah but will i get the distance (radius) i need at least 900 feet (300 meters) which would cover most of my workable acreage with the standard antennas.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplegreen View Post
    Yeah but will i get the distance (radius) i need at least 900 feet (300 meters) which would cover most of my workable acreage with the standard antennas.
    According to EAP110-Outdoor's specifications reliable coverage should be up to 200 meters: http://uk.tp-link.com/products/detai...0-Outdoor.html

    I bet you can see it at 300 meters distance also, but what type of antennas do your client devices have? They need to be powerful enough to be "seen" by the EAP, too. For example, with my Android tablet I can see the WiFi signal in a distance of 600 meters outdoor, but it will not be able to transfer data over such a distance. The tablet's antennas are just to weak to send a stable signal back to the AP.

    So you can only find out by trial and error how much coverage you really get with the standard EAP antenna or with the 15dBi external antenna and the device(s) you are using. Please let the forum know what you find out.

  11. #26
    So i finally got this thing. Never order a new product from a small company like pulling teeth. Anyway im going throught he controller software and i have a pretty easy setup. All i want to do is adopt the freaking AP. No matter what i try (even resetting the AP to factory, i cant seem to get it to adopt). I've used both the default admin/admin login/pw combo as well as the one i've created. Any ideas? i cant seem to find any mention of this issue anywhere. Either it shows me this error or says the AP im trying to adopt doesnt exist. In which case i refresh the page and try again only to get the failed info error.
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplegreen View Post
    So i finally got this thing. Never order a new product from a small company like pulling teeth. Anyway im going throught he controller software and i have a pretty easy setup. All i want to do is adopt the freaking AP. No matter what i try (even resetting the AP to factory, i cant seem to get it to adopt). I've used both the default admin/admin login/pw combo as well as the one i've created. Any ideas? i cant seem to find any mention of this issue anywhere. Either it shows me this error or says the AP im trying to adopt doesnt exist. In which case i refresh the page and try again only to get the failed info error.
    Why want you to use EAP controller at all for just one device? Rather than that, use the web UI of the EAP for configuration. To do so, set the IP of your PC to a static, free IP in the 192.168.0.0 subnet (e.g. 192.168.0.10), start a browser, load http://192.168.0.254/, configure the EAP and that's it. I would not mess with EAP controller for a single device used in standalone mode.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Why want you to use EAP controller at all for just one device? Rather than that, use the web UI of the EAP for configuration. To do so, set the IP of your PC to a static, free IP in the 192.168.0.0 subnet (e.g. 192.168.0.10), start a browser, load http://192.168.0.254/, configure the EAP and that's it. I would not mess with EAP controller for a single device used in standalone mode.
    thats exactly what i ended up doing. The documentation didn't really address stand alone mode vs multiple EAPs once i figured out i could get right into the AP i was golden. Getting pretty good range having trouble staying connected but i think those are just bugs that need to be worked out. When looking directly at the unit i have the 15dbi antenna hooked up to the right side port. Didn't seem to make a difference left or right in terms of range and since it's only a 2.4ghz band the port didn't seem to matter. Its set to 30tx suppose thats enough power to power the antenna.

  14. #29
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplegreen View Post
    Didn't seem to make a difference left or right in terms of range and since it's only a 2.4ghz band the port didn't seem to matter.
    Right, but keep in mind that 802.11n mode uses MIMO, which lets the device use space-time coding to improve quality and reduce bit error rate, but it needs two identical antennas in a well defined distance to each other (7 cm for the EAP110-Outdoor). Maybe you could get a more stable connection using the included antennas, but this is just a guess (worth a try?).

    Anyway, 300 meters is a challenge for end-user devices (laptops/tablets/smartphones), not so much for the EAP110-Outdoor, so I'm glad it works for you!
    Last edited by R1D2; 04-15-2017 at 20:49.

  15. #30
    TP links Omni-directional antenna work very well, I own a 2412D and I get coverage up to .5 mile.


 

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