Welcome to TP-LINK Tech Support Forum
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Junior Member fdonat is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1

    how to configure new purchased EAP in cluster and which EAP to purchase

    Model :

    Hardware Version :

    Firmware Version :

    ISP : [/COLOR]

    Hello,
    after a very long and frustrating try to get two Ubiquity AccessPoints (APs) to run I am thinking about using the TP-Link EAPs.
    I want to have WLAN on three floors, two APs should be enough. One to be on ground-floor, the other on second floor.

    I want to use internet and the network-printers seamlessly. So my macbook/ipad/iphone should be able to access internet and to print on every floor without manually reconnecting the internet.

    A cluster should solve my needs.

    Which APs should I use? EAP115 or EAP220?
    Do I need a PC to run the EAP configuration-program or can I do this on one AP and it broadcasts the config to the other?

    Would a VOIP-call be supported to "roam" as well?

    Every answer is very much appreciated.

    Best regards,
    Frank

  2. #2
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by fdonat View Post
    A cluster should solve my needs.
    Why a cluster? A cluster only lets you address the EAPs as one device for administration, which makes sense if you have a dozen of them to administrate.

    To have wireless roaming, just set the same ESSID on both APs and connect them to the same subnet. The wireless adapters of your devices will seamlessly change the BSSID of the APs as needed.

    Which APs should I use? EAP115 or EAP220?
    Depends on your needs. The EAP110 may also be a choice, it uses so-called passive PoE and comes with a PoE injector. The EAP115 needs an 802.3af-PoE-capable switch such as the TL-SG105/108PE if you want to provide power over the data cable (else you would need to use the included power supply and a mains plug). The EAP220 gives you dual-band WiFi, but it needs an 802.3at-capable switch, which are more expensive than 802.3af, or the included power supply. My favorite EAP for home installation is the EAP120 powered through a TL-SG108PE. See the comparison table on the product site (scroll to the end): http://www.tp-link.com/us/products/d...92_EAP115.html

    Do I need a PC to run the EAP configuration-program or can I do this on one AP and it broadcasts the config to the other?
    No, the EAPs have a built-in web UI. But you could use the EAP controller to manage the EAPs (again makes not much sense for two EAPs unless you need user management, guest networks, statistics, etc.). The models supporting cluster and config broadcasts are nice, but since you should use different WiFi channels on the EAPs, it's not of a big advantage to have config settings being broadcast to the two devices. Usually, you need to configure the devices only once, but not every other day, do you?

    Would a VOIP-call be supported to "roam" as well?
    Sure, if you use the same ESSID, every IP-based application will continue to work while switching an AP in the same subnet if you are leaving the WiFi cell of the other one even if you use different WiFi channels (what you should). But depending on handshake of your phone's WiFi adapter, there could be a short delay or a short break, which even happens with VoIP on wired lines occasionally.
    Last edited by R1D2; 02-09-2017 at 16:16.

  3. #3
    Personally I am enjoying the performance of my EAP245, but the EAP220 should suit most peoples' needs just fine and I'd hazard a guess that unless you're doing a lot of LAN-to-LAN streaming (e.g. between two wireless clients on your network, or a wired and wireless client) the EAP115 will be perfectly acceptable.

    Contrary to R1D2's claim, the EAP220 is 802.3af-compatible as well (does not require 802.3at -- see second bullet point at top of page), and can be used with any 802.3af power injector; from what I can see only the EAP3xx series (such as the EAP320, see last bullet point at top of page) needs 802.3at.

    I'd agree with R1D2 that using the EAP controller is probably overkill for just one or two access points, as you do need a Windows computer to run the controller. If you do feel like running a controller, you could run it on a Windows VPS instance in AWS or another hosting provider so you don't have to have a computer in your house running 24/7; this is what I do. It takes a little more setup work to run (and secure) an externally-hosted controller, but it's a one-time thing and then all you have to do is RDP in every now and then to make sure Windows is updated, etc.

  4. #4
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by DocJones View Post
    Contrary to R1D2's claim, the EAP220 is 802.3af-compatible as well (does not require 802.3at -- see second bullet point at top of page), and can be used with any 802.3af power injector; from what I can see only the EAP3xx series (such as the EAP320, see last bullet point at top of page) needs 802.3at.
    You're right. TP-Link got it wrong in their comparison table on the linked EAP115 page which claims the EAP220 would need 802.3at - it does not. It consumes max. 9.6 watts, which can be supplied by a 802.3af switch easily. Thank you for the clarification!

  5. #5
    Oddly, I just looked at the box for my EAP245 and that claims "802.3at" right on the front. I'm now more confused than ever... but my 802.3af injector seems to be running it just fine on a ~50ft length of Cat 5.

    IIRC the specs on the device label say 0.4A at 37-57V; if the label's amperage is rounded up from 0.35A (350mA) that would just barely skate in at the 802.3af PD maximums... though it's quite possible this label is over-rated to illustrate compliance with the 802.3af spec (and prevent TPLink warranty/support from having to deal with injectors that are below spec -- "says right on the label 37-57V at 0.4A, not our problem you're using a 36 volt injector!"). As long as you don't have an anemic/overloaded PSE or a 100-meter run of below-spec Cat 3 to your AP, 802.3af should get the job done.

  6. #6
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    1,003
    Quote Originally Posted by DocJones View Post
    Oddly, I just looked at the box for my EAP245 and that claims "802.3at" right on the front. I'm now more confused than ever... but my 802.3af injector seems to be running it just fine on a ~50ft length of Cat 5.
    Depends on cable length, type of power supply and actual power consumption if fully loaded (e.g. 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz clients simultaneously connected). Maximum guaranteed power for 802.3af is 12.95 W due to possible power loss on long cables and use of a switching power supply. According to the specs the EAP245 consumes 12.7 W so it operates on the possible limit of 802.3af. Depending on the cable the limit could be slightly exceeded by the EAP245 under full load under certain environmental conditions (it's usually recommended to have a 20% to 30% reserve for any power supply, therefore the specification of 802.3at for the EAP245). But with ~50ft cable length you should be on the safe side with 802.3af.

    What's funny: on the German TP-Link website they specify 802.3af under "Functions", but 802.3at under "Specifications" for the EAP245. So one can probably choose either one.


 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Copyright 1996-2017 TP-LINK Technologies Co., Ltd. All rights reserved.