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  1. #1

    CPE210 recovery not working

    Model :

    Hardware Version :

    Firmware Version :

    ISP : [/COLOR]

    Hello, I have a CPE210 with Hw verson 1.1

    I hae updated fw with an Openwrt version but I want now to go back to the original one.

    I am following the procedure provided by tp-link (there is also a thread here in the forum). The problem I a facing is that the file transfer (after resetting the unit and having openend a TFTP server session is never finishing : it stops randomly at different percentages . After it the CPE reboot but it still have the old (Openwrt) fw. I tried using Win 10 and as well Win 7. I have a switch between the PC and the CPE...

    Any suggestion?
    thank you
    Carlo

  2. #2

    Post

    any help or suggestion here?
    Thank you very much

    Carlo

  3. #3
    Members R1D2 is on a distinguished road
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    Only a guess: tftpd32/64 come with a DHCP server enabled by default in last version I saw. Make sure all services except TFTP are disabled in tftpd32/64. Windows firewall settings or even anti-virus programs could also probably cause trouble (as usual on Windows). If possible at all, use a TFTP server on a Linux box instead, it's way more reliable.

  4. #4
    very strange behaviour...I tried several time using W10 as well as Win 7 and different TFTP applications. Firewall disabled. Switch added between the CPE210 and the PC...


    Normally the recovery mode goes to 70% and then the device restart but without completing the restore procedure (because after the restard I still habe the Openwrt LEDE fw starting up). One question: becuase I have the device starting with Openwrt Lede and with LUCI available, is there a possibility to reload the original TP link FW fro this LUCI session/page? I tried but it says the file I am trying to load doesn't contain the right code... (I do not remeber the precise message)

    Thank you

    Carlo

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by beekeeper View Post
    is there a possibility to reload the original TP link FW fro this LUCI session/page?
    Not that I know of. OpenWRT's sysupgrade used by LuCI uses magic cookies to identify firmware, which might not be present in TP-Link firmware.

    But did you read the section about de-bricking the CPE210 at the OpenWRT site carefully?
    • and I have never been able to recover from Win XP and Win 10, only with Win 7 been successful all the time, without switch
    Seems that the 70% probability you observed for successful TFTP boots is caused by Windows or its TFTPD software.

    Try to use a Linux Live CD such as Knoppix, Ubuntu or Debian and save yourself much time and trouble. Every Windows user should have such a Live CD or bootable stick for emergency situations. I use Unix and FreeBSD systems for TFTP recovery from OpenWRT to TP-Link firmware and it works flawlessly.

  6. #6
    @beekeeper via TFTP sysupgrade from Index of /chaos_calmer/15.05.1/ar71xx/ https://downloads.openwrt.org/chaos_...r71xx/generic/
    if you are successful then try going back to stock

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    That's useless, because OpenWRT doesn't touch the CPE's boot loader, which implements TFTP recovery.
    Had a case like this one, and using that method worked out
    Don't forget that on networking and other topics
    What doesn't work for some, does not mean it won't work for others
    On the other hand, what he got to lose by trying
    You or someone else mentioned Linux live CD or boot Linux via usb before on this topic, and he doesn't want to try it, or doesn't understand or doesn't want to go that route

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Wether you like it or not: Windows is not considered a reliable system
    as you are answering to me, in what post of the Tp_Link forum I posted any about Windows been the greatest.
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    And by the way: this is the business forum. People posting here should know how to boot a Linux live CD on their PC
    I do not agree with you in this one, life is free will, and anyone is free to buy a CPE, the box has no warnings, they are not buying cigarrettes, the box warns you
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Read the fine manual, that's why we wrote them on the OpenWRT site and elsewhere! https://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link...210#debricking
    Again as you are answering to me, why do you send me to read, after 973 posts, I haven`t made a question or asked for help to no one, and never will
    and why do you link me to the OpenWrt Wiki, I was the one that uploaded the link on Debricking area in OpenWrt Wiki
    Last edited by danymarc; 02-18-2017 at 00:42.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    If you didn't get it, the thread opener has problems with Windows 10, not with the the CPE. It's a known bug that tftpd32 on Windows 10 is broken and tftpd32 is widely known to make several problems at many other occasion
    But you are addressing this one to me, I'm not the one with the issue
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Wrong, there is indeed a warning from TP-Link on the CPE's login page:
    This TP-Link wireless device must be installed by a certified professional
    #1-professionals use Cambium or other brands on their installs
    #2-a great percentage of people buy gear online, or on stores, they buy first then use the login page after
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    If you uploaded it, why at all are we discussing that it doesn't work? If it indeed can be made to work, why do you not update the de-bricking section on the OpenWRT site with your tip
    Only one having the issue, enough to update the Wiki, no I don't think so, on Tp-Link link I posted I had only had success with Win 7
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    EOD with you, your tone is too aggressive for my taste.
    I'm sorry you feel that, not my intention, but you opened Pandora's box
    At the end, the one with the issue, isn't updating the post neither with your tips or mine, meaning he is careless
    As he is careless, and our lasts post benefit no one
    I suggest to erase them scince my useless tip, (according to you) and you know 95% more of OpenWrt than me
    I will be visiting the forum, once I see you had erased them I will to
    You can send me PM to let me know or WhatsApp I let my telephone number in your inbox
    Regards
    Last edited by danymarc; 02-18-2017 at 15:50.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by danymarc View Post
    But you are addressing this one to me, I'm not the one with the issue
    Sorry, then this was a mis-understanding. You said you were the one stating on the OpenWRT CPE page that Windows 10 doesn't work for CPE's TFTP recovery.
    Then you said here, that it indeed works for you on Windows 10. What is now correct? Does it work on Windows 10?

    Doing lot of TFTP recovery with TP-Link gear for customers I never had any problem to do so, not even once. There are so many issues caused by using Windows that a huge amount of engineering time goes into fixing bugs introduced first time by Microsoft, therefore they are wasting huge amounts of precious lifetime of their own users and also engineering time of technicians not even using MS products.

    If Microsoft would have chosen to produce cars instead of computer software, we couldn't even drive 1 kilometer without having to call a mechanic every 5 meters to proceed further. That's no joke! 90% of all calls to our support hotline are Windows-related weirdness having nothing to do with real bugs.

    At the end, the one with the issue, isn't updating the post neither with your tips or mine, meaning he is careless
    As he is careless, and our lasts post benefit no one
    I suggest to erase them scince my useless tip, (according to you) and you know 95% more of OpenWrt than me
    I will be visiting the forum, once I see you had erased them I will to
    Agreed. See, I really appreciate your long-term experience with CPEs, it's very valuable to developers and all other users to learn about problems or to hear about successful use cases and I very much appreciate tips from you such as the one about UBNT air link calculator in another thread.


    But it's Sunday, we have the time today to dig a little deeper into this never-ending story with Windows notorious non-deterministic behaviour called "bugs".

    So what follows is some background info just to make it clear why Windows behaves in such weird ways it still does:

    Guess which company once did sell the most popular (by installation count) Unix system ever, predecessor of Linux?

    It was Microsoft. They did sell Xenix systems, which was a 100% compatible Unix port for then new IBM PCs. MS did even volunteer to provide support for AT&T's own Unix system running on PDP-11 platforms in the 1980s, which AT&T couldn't provide for legal reasons. So the very first systems Microsoft sold once have been properly working Unix systems. This was the crew then at MS:

    Name:  ms1978.jpg
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    But then they decided to develop DOS and later Windows to make everything different from their own Xenix for only one reason: to bind customers to MS and especially to sell software, which back in the 1960s and 1970s has been Open Source, free for everyone (yes, hardware was that much expensive, so that every operating system software of any vendor always was included as a gift together with the expensive hardware).

    This way Microsoft did invent software one has to pay for. It was absolutely new in the IT industry back in those times to claim money for an operating system.

    And it was the beginning of thousands if not millions of bugs and intentionally weird concepts to undermine common standards, so people would be forced to call MS support and, of course, pay for everything to make Bill Gates (on the lower left in the above picture) a rich man. They started kind of an OS war intentionally, not by accident.

    Be assured: using Unix/Linux is much easier and will allow you to get your work done much faster than Windows ever could.

    It's no coincidence that CPE's firmware, OpenWRT and most other embedded devices use Linux as their software base.

    So my recommendation in last 30 years is and will ever be: dare yourself to take a look at Linux, it's not that difficult to use it and it will save you hours, if not days or months of trouble such as a tiny, simple piece of software like TFTPD not working correctly on Windows.

    TFTP is a very old standard from late 1970s, it works for decades now on Unix-based and many other platforms without any problems. It's ridiculous that TFTP is not working on modern Windows out of the box.
    Last edited by R1D2; 02-19-2017 at 11:09.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Sorry, then this was a mis-understanding. You said you were the one stating on the OpenWRT CPE page that Windows 10 doesn't work for CPE's TFTP recovery.
    Then you said here, that it indeed works for you on Windows 10. What is now correct? .
    I don't remember posting that it works, and if I did miss typo or language barrier
    This is from Tp-Link Recovery tip
    From post 4 Could never made it work in Win XP, when I posted I wasn't using W10
    From post 6 according to this post, ubuntu server running atftp server recovers too
    My business is Photography, networking is a hobby, I use very little Ubuntu and always boot from a bootable USB
    Never need it to use tftp in Linux, all I know is that you install it on Ubuntu type sudo apt-get install tftp and I'm confused with SUDO when to use it when not
    My suggestion, load a tutorial on how to tftp in Ubuntu or the Linux you prefer
    All I know is that if you don't disconnect hard drive you might lose the info. never happened with a Dell Laptop but with Inspiron Dell PC if I boot Ubuntu from USB
    Wipes out the info of the hard drive even if I have partitions, wipes them and I end up with only one partition, this happened booting Ubuntu and Mikrotic
    Regards happy Sunday
    Last edited by danymarc; 02-19-2017 at 14:51.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by danymarc View Post
    My suggestion, load a tutorial on how to tftp in Ubuntu or the Linux you prefer
    Easy. Enter in a terminal window aka shell window the command:

    sudo apt-get install atftpd atftp

    Done. That's all. Client (atftp) just included in case you want to test the sever before doing recovery of CPE.

    The installation script already created a TFTP directory:

    drwxr-xr-x 2 nobody root 4096 Aug 10 11:15 /srv/tftp/

    Put your file in there - using sudo cp cpe-firmware.bin /srv/tftp/ - and start the bootloader recovery from the CPE.
    Of course you need to find out the IP your PC has in your network (just do a sudo ifconfig -a to see the IP).

    and I'm confused with SUDO when to use it when not
    sudo is needed for administrative tasks such as installations or writing into directories owned by some other user or displaying sensitive data such as network configs. Therefore you would use sudo to do the things shown above. This is needed b/c Linux has a rights management, which will prevent viruses from installing itself on hard-disks, something Microsoft learned only after two decades of desaster with viruses in DOS and Windows. Glad that they learned it at all, but only b/c of pressure by U.S. government, which refused to buy non-POSIX systems w/o rights mgmt. anymore for governmental institutions.

    All I know is that if you don't disconnect hard drive you might lose the info. never happened with a Dell Laptop but with Inspiron Dell PC if I boot Ubuntu from USB
    Wipes out the info of the hard drive even if I have partitions, wipes them and I end up with only one partition, this happened booting Ubuntu and Mikrotic
    An Ubuntu or Knoppix Live boot image never ever installs itself on or wipes out the hard disks.

    If you by accident load the installation image instead of the Live boot image, then yes, it offers you to install itself on some free partition, but it never changes anything on the disk without asking for explicit confirmation beforehand. It even offers to install a bootloader from where you always can still boot your existing Windows, but it even does not offer to delete existing data on any data partition. You have to do this manually, e.g. by cleaning the partition table.

    Live images are especially useful to save your work in emergency situations if Windows can't access the hard-disks anymore for whatever reason. Live images often can still access the hard-disk and read the data from a Windows partition if Windows itself refuses to even recognize the hard-disk. Therefore Live images never wipe out anything already present on hard-disks except you explicitly say so, e.g. by re-partitioning.

    Linux is your friend, it does exactly what you tell it - not less, not more - and it does it in a reliable, deterministic way.

    That being said, I wish you a nice sunday evening and much fun with Linux. Of course, it has a learning curve, but what you learn will be useful in next 50 years. Windows also has a learning curve, but one each again for every OS version.
    Last edited by R1D2; 02-19-2017 at 17:35.

  13. #13
    Thank you very much for your suggestions.
    This week I will installa ubuntu on my pc and will try .

    Will let you now soon

    Calo

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    An Ubuntu or Knoppix Live boot image never ever installs itself
    @R1D2 Thank you for the Tutorial
    Finally @beekeeper is alive
    you are correct, but as I posted, I only Boot Ubuntu USB never install, and to be sure what has happened I did it on purpÚse 2 more times with the Hard drive connected and wiped out the info.
    never used Live CD, its easier form me to use a bootable USB
    Regards

  15. #15
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    The term "live image" describes a non-destructive, not self-installing boot image. This image can be booted from CD, from USB sticks, from magnetic tapes, from TFTP servers, from floppy disks, even from punch tapes or whatever you choose as a bootable medium.

    A live image differs from a normal boot image in that a so-called "live image" does not start an installation procedure automatically after boot, but just brings up the operating system in normal operation mode, meaning you will immediately be able to use the desktop GUI with almost all applications as if you would have installed it permanently. Since a live image just runs in main memory (RAM) and does not touch your hard-disks, every change on files in such a live image takes place only in the main memory and therefore will be lost on shutdown.

    So, live images are very useful if you want try out Linux without having to go through the full installation procedure and - most important - if you want to test it without changing a single bit of data already on your hard-disks, although you could access the hard-disk's content from within a live image if you want to do so, but usually only in a non-destructive, read-only mode by default.

    If you are new to Linux and just want to see what it looks & feels like, use a live image. If you like what you see, you might then choose to install it permanently on your hard-disk.

    If Windows ever makes trouble with not being able to access a hard-disk (i.e. not booting anymore), use a Linux live image to see wether you can access the disks and save your data. Some of my customers did this more than once successfully, although Windows reported the disks as defective.
    Last edited by R1D2; 02-20-2017 at 16:16.


 

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