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  1. #1

    Does the height of two AP have to be the same?

    Model : TL-WA5210G

    Hardware Version :

    Firmware Version :

    ISP : [/COLOR]

    I own 2 tlwa5210g, i linked then in bridge mode to get internet to a remote house on top of a mountain. The speed is very slow and gets worse depending the time of day. After 2 years the speed has gotten worse than 50k at some hours. I thought it has to do with 2.4gz and how many devices might broadcast in 2.4ghz, so i bought a tl wa7510n, but it disconnects after an hour. Apparently this is a well knwon issue

    http://www.tp-link.com/la/faq-463.html

    I havent gotten around upgrading it yet, but the speed is still pretty slow for the 2 hours that its connected. For now i am using the tlwa5210g. The speed is under 50k Here is an example of how the connection works.
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    There is a CLEAR line of sight NO obstructions, i can see the other house.

    Distance between two points is 2km

    Height of ap that broadcasts is 10m. The height of the ap that receives on top of the mountain is 110m

    Does the 80m height diffirence matters?

    The aps are not alligned to look up or down in order to directly face each other.

    Why is the connection speed so slow?

    The internet connection typse is vdsl, does that matter? I pay for 40mbps and i get 30-50-150-220kbps depending the time of day.

    Please help me understand how cant i fix this problem.

  2. #2
    About speed:
    Interference (radio, physical, electrical) and the distance from client device to the Access Point are two major factors that have a negative impact on observed maximum throughput. The half-duplex nature of wireless means that the actual throughput is typically 50 percent or less of the data rate 150Mbps. Under a ideal situation, 150Mbps data rate will at last result in less than 75Mbps in LAN side(wireless).


    About height for installation:
    Best throughput can be achieved when all the access points are mounted at the same height. For your actual environment, it's kinda difficult to achieve. 80m height diffirence matters a lot. because 7510N has a very short beamwidth Vertical: 14 and the other AP will be out of vertical angel coverage due to height differences.

    You can deal with it by adjusting the angle of inclination of both APs to make both are covered to each other. Also, you need to perform a site survey and measure a desired data speed and determine a proper installation height.
    Attached Images  

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by vasil View Post
    Does the 80m height diffirence matters?
    No. It's just distance between APs that matters. But 2km is maximum range for TL-WA5210 already.

    The aps are not alligned to look up or down in order to directly face each other.
    This is what causes your problems. Align them properly to face each other. The APs have directional antennas and such antennas always needs to be aligned in a straight line.

    Also align the antenna's RSSI range (see the "Antenna Alignment" menu setting). Make sure the distance setting of both APs in the menu "Distance Setting" reflects the correct distance.

    I would recommend to use the pair of TL-WA7510 if you have a spare pair already. Its CPU is twice as fast as the CPU of a TL-WA5210 and its max distance is specified for 5km while the TL-WA5210's maximum range is 2km only.
    Last edited by R1D2; 12-29-2017 at 20:37.

  4. #4
    The antenas are alligned in a straight line but the heigh diffirence means i cant make one antenna to look up and the other one to look down. How can i do that? Do i need some kind of device? Like a rotating pole that can adjust up and down? How do i know they face each other, they are too far i obviously cant see them with binoculars?

    Also does the ap have to be away from a tv antenna? Could that be the problem?

    Is an external antena gonna help? Should i buy one?

    The antenna alignment has the ability to broadcast sideways, is that more helpfull in my situation or worse?

    http://www.tp-link.com/res/upfile/fa...0202030439.jpg

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by vasil View Post
    The antenas are alligned in a straight line but the heigh diffirence means i cant make one antenna to look up and the other one to look down. How can i do that? Do i need some kind of device? Like a rotating pole that can adjust up and down?
    I'm not sure what you mean? Is there a free line of sight or not? If you have free line of sight, what prevents you from mounting the antennas so that they face each other? Of course pole mounting gear is available which can be used to adjust an antenna. Each and every TV satellite antenna is adjusted to the satellite this way. So you can do this with WiFi gear, too! For example, see http://www.l-com.com/wireless-antenn...ounts-brackets

    As for precise alignment you can use the LEDs on the rear of the TL-WA5210, also the signal strength/signal noise indicators in the web UI are helpful.

    Also see http://www.tp-link.com/ph/faq-1044.html for common tips on outdoor AP alignment including the TL-WA5210.
    Last edited by R1D2; 12-29-2017 at 19:25.

  6. #6
    http://www.tp-link.com/res/upfile/fa...0202030455.jpg
    This is what i mean how can i tilt the ap in order for the one on the bottom looking straight up and the other one to look straight down. How can i be sure that they are in the correct height? You say LEDs on the rear of the device, are you saying that the LED are indicating if the aps are in proper allignment? Because all i see is all the LEDs are on and the lan led constantly blinks while the internet is used. So what exactly do i need to look at the LEDs for?

    You meantion a signal strength/noise indicators in web UI, could you please link this web UI you talking about? Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by vasil View Post
    This is what i mean how can i tilt the ap in order for the one on the bottom looking straight up and the other one to look straight down.
    With such a mount bracket for example. It lets you align the APs by 360 around the horizontal axis:

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    How can i be sure that they are in the correct height?
    Again: the height of the pole is irrelevant. You just have to mount the APs in a way that there is a clear line of sight, i.e. no obstacles in the line from AP to AP. Depending on the exact position of the house on the hill there might be trees covering the line of sight and only then you need to consider the height of the pole. In this case the height must be chosen so that there is a 60% clearance in the first fresnel zone. The positions of the APs in the photo above look like this:

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    In this case my pole for the local AP is 1m mounted on a balcony yielding 4.5m above ground with the AP pointing downward, while the pole for the remote AP is 0.5m on a wall yielding about 2m above ground with the AP pointing upward to the hill.

    You say LEDs on the rear of the device, are you saying that the LED are indicating if the aps are in proper allignment? Because all i see is all the LEDs are on and the lan led constantly blinks while the internet is used. So what exactly do i need to look at the LEDs for?
    See the TL-WA5210 installation guide, available on TP-Link's website:

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    Wireless signal strength shows you the signal strength. Align the remote (client) AP until all LEDs lighting constantly show best signal strength. Note that alignment using signal strength LEDs requires to be on the remote site where the WA5210 works in client mode. In AP mode all signal strength LEDs are always constantly lighting.

    You meantion a signal strength/noise indicators in web UI, could you please link this web UI you talking about? Thanks.
    I have TL-WA7210, but web UI is mostly the same, so look for the "Antenna Alignment" menu. This is from the TL-WA5210 installation guide:

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    Alignment by checking for signal quality and signal strength aka RSSI (= Receive Signal Strength Indicator) in the web UI works on both sites, no matter wether the device is set in client or AP mode.
    Last edited by R1D2; 12-30-2017 at 14:07.

  8. #8
    After weeks of testing

    The receiving wa7510n loses connection after 1 hour, the network becomes "unidentified network"

    Hardware version is V1, latest firmwire version.

    I guess the AP is broken?

    The
    WA5210G gets 400kbs very late at night and early in the morning but at 8:00 it drops to 100kbs and later at 40 kpbs

    Why is that?

  9. #9
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    Drops in speed could be caused by interferences in the 2.4 GHz band for TL-WA5210G. However, 400 kbps is pretty bad for a device capable of speeds up to 22 Mbps under ideal conditions.

    How did you measure this throughput?

  10. #10
    What you mean by output? Ill repeat myself 1-5 oclock in the morning i get 400kpbs, during day time i get from 40kpbs to 150kbps.

    These speeds are insanely low. You say its interference, ok how do i combat this?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by vasil View Post
    What you mean by output? Ill repeat myself 1-5 oclock in the morning i get 400kpbs, during day time i get from 40kpbs to 150kbps.
    Didn't ask for output. I asked: how you do the measurement of the throughput (400/40 kbps)?

  12. #12
    I used speedtest and downloading things. at 1 oclock during nightime i get 380-400-450.. During daytime i get 40-80-120kbs

  13. #13
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    Internet speed tests are not very reliable. They measure the speed of the DSLAM, your ISP's throughput, their uplink, website loading speed etc. To measure the wireless speed of the access points, you should use a reliable measurement tool such as iperf running on two systems connected to the APs by wire. If it then turns out that the AP achieves a better throughput, you have isolated the bottleneck. Best indicator that the wireless link between your APs is not the bottleneck here are the varying results you see during night and day.

  14. #14
    My speed non wireless speed is 40mpbs, download speeds are 35-40mpbs .

    The wireless speed is 40 kbps to 120, to 200kbps and during 1 oclock in the morning 400 kbps, This is proven through months of testing with speedtests and downloads

    I dont get what you mean by isolating the bottleneck, running a program doesnt tell me why my wireless speed is so riddicusly low.

    The problem is clearly the link between those two, the other ap, the newer model gets the same speeds, it didnt use to be like this a year ago, Like i said during nighttime the speed is 4 times higher, what on earth causes this?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by vasil View Post
    I dont get what you mean by isolating the bottleneck, running a program doesnt tell me why my wireless speed is so riddicusly low.
    Doing professional speed test on the wifi link will reveal wether the bottleneck is the wifi link and it will tell about the actual speed possible on this wireless link. Speed tests over the Internet are no reliable way to measure wireless speeds, but the speed of the whole way from your laptop over the wireless link over the ISP's infrastructure over many routers on the backbone up to the website where the speed test is running. This makes the difference.

    Like i said during nighttime the speed is 4 times higher, what on earth causes this?
    Typically variations between speed - especially over day and night - happens on the Internet all the time and in every country. That's why I doubt that it has anything to do with the speed of a wireless link.


 

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