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  1. #1

    Gated Community Wifi for CCTV and hotspot

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    We live in a small gated community and currently use an old analog DVR CCTV solution which is practically EOL
    We now intend to switch to an IP network for the CCTVs and while we are at it,we are also hoping to setup a community WLAN that can be used for provisioning Internet Access in the common/opean areas.

    The total number of IP cameras is 8 with the possibility of extending it to say 12 if needed
    The total number of residents is around 150 with say a maximum of 50 concurrent users and an average of 15-20

    The attached image should help visualize it.
    The server room is in the Community area while the cameras are mounted in the central area of Block A-B-C
    All the houses are two floor units although some of the trees that can be seen just to the right of the Community area are fairly tall - However It's a single row of trees so while it impacts the line-of-sight but does not block it completely

    I currently have two options

    1) Run CAT6 from server room to Block A and B + OFC with media converter to Block C along the outer boundary - Then add a switch in each block that hooks wired to the Camera as well as few Access Points to provision WLAN access for that zone

    2) Opt for a fully wireless model - i.e. setup a point-to-point link from server room to each block and then use a few APs in each block to spread the network- I spoke to a vendor today who said he could set allof this up using a combination of Ubiquiti Nanostation M2 and M5

    While I would certainly prefer to avoid going the cable route , somehow I was not fully convinced by the technical capabilities of the vendor in question

    In addition, pricing for TP-Link Pharos products is significantly more attractive in my country (India)


    Coming to my doubts now:

    A) Would a Pharos based setup in the layout be reliable enough for a CCTV NVR setup?

    B) What would be the recommended set of products

    C) What is the realistic stable throughput I can expect

    D) Using the rooftops for the point to point, I can get near Line-of-sight but with a bit of disruption from a single layer of tree foliage- Is that not a major concern or should I look at using poles to the roof top to go above the treeline

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    It's probably worth mentioning that this is located in the middle of a big city in India and we are surrounded by several tall residential towers so expect a lot of 802.11 noise and interefernce in the neighborhood

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by superczar View Post
    A) Would a Pharos based setup in the layout be reliable enough for a CCTV NVR setup?
    Yes, definitely. We use those devices for CCTV installations, too.

    B) What would be the recommended set of products
    For option 1) WBS210 with new antenna TL-ANT2410MO (coming soon) for omnidirectional coverage or EAP110-Outdoor if you don't want to wait for it.

    For option 2) WBS510/CPE510 for the direct links between server room and cameras and above devices for distributing the signal wirelessly.

    C) What is the realistic stable throughput I can expect

    Difficult to say, but for direct 5 GHz links 70 to 90 Mbit/s should be possible (for all clients of a single Pharos station, including directional links), lower speeds for 2.4 GHz depending on the amount of other 2.4 GHz equipment interfering with your network.

    D) Using the rooftops for the point to point, I can get near Line-of-sight but with a bit of disruption from a single layer of tree foliage- Is that not a major concern or should I look at using poles to the roof top to go above the treeline
    If possible, yes, it would be good to go above treeline for the first fresnel zone. See
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fresnel_zone

    It's probably worth mentioning that this is located in the middle of a big city in India and we are surrounded by several tall residential towers so expect a lot of 802.11 noise and interefernce in the neighborhood
    That's what influences throughput suggested above. Only way to find out is either with professional measurements or trial & error at the location.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post



    For option 1) WBS210 with new antenna TL-ANT2410MO (coming soon) for omnidirectional coverage or EAP110-Outdoor if you don't want to wait for it.

    For option 2) WBS510/CPE510 for the direct links between server room and cameras and above devices for distributing the signal wirelessly.

    Many Thanks !
    Option 2 is the final model we want to go with

    I do have a few more specific doubts on that topology though

    1) In order to keep the throughput high, I presume it would make sense to have a dedicated point-to-point backhaul for each block .
    Thus in effect we install three separate antennas on the server room (WBS510?) each dedicated to a block
    Each block gets 1 CPE510 - Is there any advantage to doing this? I presume this would help in keeping the throughput availability at peak in each block?

    Also, I am still not 100% clear about the difference between a CPE510 and a WBS510
    Is the WBS510 better suited as the server side base station for a point to multi-point distribution?
    And if so, would using 3 X 2 pairs of CPE510 be better suited for dedicated point-to-point links?

    2) Within each block, I still need to transfer the bridged connection from the CPE510 on the rooftop of one house to the APs (EAP110) in the central area of the block
    I can potentially run a wire from the roof to the ground and hook it to the EAP110
    However, if I choose to use another pair of CPE510 (or CPE210) to bridge from roof to ground level AP, would that cause any real world issues?


    i.e. For one block: Server room -> CPE510 (or WBS510) -> CPE510 in Block A (rooftop on one house) -> CPE510 (facing towards garden)->CPE510 (sitting next to EAP110)-> wired to 1 X EAP110 on garden edge + 1 X EAP110 at diagonal edge of garden in extender mode
    Last edited by superczar; 09-14-2017 at 17:42.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by superczar View Post
    1) In order to keep the throughput high, I presume it would make sense to have a dedicated point-to-point backhaul for each block .
    Thus in effect we install three separate antennas on the server room (WBS510?) each dedicated to a block
    Each block gets 1 CPE510 - Is there any advantage to doing this? I presume this would help in keeping the throughput availability at peak in each block?
    Yes. The WBS/CPEs have a data throughput of max. 100 Mbit/s (due to the Fast Ethernet IF) over the air. Wireless frames travel with up to 300 Mbit/s between the devices. Using three pairs for each block you could achieve 3x 100 Mbit/s, while with one at the server room and one in each block you would just be able to achieve 1/3 for each block.

    Also, I am still not 100% clear about the difference between a CPE510 and a WBS510
    Is the WBS510 better suited as the server side base station for a point to multi-point distribution?
    It's just the antennas. CPE510 has built-in directional antennas, while the WBS510 can be used with directional sector or dish antennas. CPE's antenna beam width is 45, while the sector antenna offers up to 120 (@6dBm) resp. 90 (@3dBm). If you use three pairs for the links between server room and the blocks, you actually don't need sector antennas, so 3x2 CPE510 would be best solution for three direct links, since they are much cheaper then two WBS510 with a sector antennas, which would be required to have one facing to block A and one facing to blocks B and C.

    2) Within each block, I still need to transfer the bridged connection from the CPE510 on the rooftop of one house to the APs (EAP110) in the central area of the block
    I can potentially run a wire from the roof to the ground and hook it to the EAP110
    However, if I choose to use another pair of CPE510 (or CPE210) to bridge from roof to ground level AP, would that cause any real world issues?
    Sure it causes issues: it needs AirTime in the frequency band. While at 5 GHz this is not critical, with CPE210 it needs 4 channels (@20MHz channel width) or even 8 channels (@40 MHz channel width) out of a frequency band which just has 3 or 4 non-overlapping channels (depends on WiFi b/g/n mode and allowed channels in your country). Since a CPE transmitting will silence all other wireless devices (CPEs, EAPs and even client devices), it is better to use cables from the roof to the bottom - this does not allocate valuable AirTIme and will avoid interferences between devices. Take into account clients connecting to the EAPs, they will acquire part of the total bandwidth, too! So wireless links just from the roof to the bottom are a waste of ressources (at least i the small and overcrowded 2.4 GHz band).

    i.e. For one block: Server room -> CPE510 (or WBS510) -> CPE510 in Block A (rooftop on one house) -> CPE510 (facing towards garden)->CPE510 (sitting next to EAP110)-> wired to 1 X EAP110 on garden edge + 1 X EAP110 at diagonal edge of garden in extender mode
    Note that the EAP110-Outdoor can't be used in repeater or extender mode. It's just an AP. If you need repeater/extender mode you should use a WBS210 with TL-ANT2410MO, only problem is that this omnidirectional outdoor antenna (with 360 beam width) is not available right now, but long awaited for. First omni antenna for Pharos OBS210 was announced long time ago, but it did made it into EAP110-Outdoor eventually and the OBS210 was completely dropped - it did never appear on the market. But soon the ANT2410MO will be available for WBS210 making it a fully replacement for the EAP110-Outdoor. This antenna for the WBS210 will allow to set the WBS to all modes supported by Pharos (e.g. repeater, bridge etc.). See http://www.tp-link.com.au/products/d...ANT2410MO.html
    Last edited by R1D2; 09-14-2017 at 18:23.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post

    Note that the EAP110-Outdoor can't be used in repeater or extender mode. It's just an AP. If you need repeater/extender mode you should use a WBS210 with TL-ANT2410MO, only problem is that this omnidirectional outdoor antenna (with 360 beam width) is not available right now, but long awaited for. First omni antenna for Pharos OBS210 was announced long time ago, but it did made it into EAP110-Outdoor eventually and the OBS210 was completely dropped - it did never appear on the market. But soon the ANT2410MO will be available for WBS210 making it a fully replacement for the EAP110-Outdoor. This antenna for the WBS210 will allow to set the WBS to all modes supported by Pharos (e.g. repeater, bridge etc.). See http://www.tp-link.com.au/products/d...ANT2410MO.html
    I wish I could buy you a beer!
    So if I understand this correctly, the right way to go about it would be:

    1 - Server to Block A-B-C rooftop
    3 X pairs of CPE510 to get (hopefully) 70-80 mbps, max 100 at each block rooftop

    2 - Rooftop to Garden omni AP (1)

    Option A - Wired connection to one of the EAP 110s at one garden edge (preferred)

    Option B - Another pair of CPE510 to try avoid interference in the 2.4 Ghz band (backup option- This would mean a dependency on the house owner + the adjacent house to be OK with running a visible cable along his walls - Not a problem for the block I am in but would prefer to keep this option open just in case

    3 - Garden Omni AP (2)

    Such a shame - The problem is running a cable from the first AP to the second is going to be very difficult since it would require digging up the pathways
    One possibility i can think of is to use a pair of cheap indoor AP (set to bridge) housed in an IP66 box next to the first and second AP (keeping them in 2.4G band ) and connect them wired via a switch (i.e incoming to AP 1 goes to switch first - then to the bridge AP and 1st EAP110 while the second bridge goes wired to second EAP110) - I understand this would affect throughput on the 2nd AP but the area is not going to be covered well by a single AP on the edge


    I guess there are no other alternatives really other than using this inelegant hack..
    Or are there any other Omni APs or outdoor mesh products (non TP-Link) that I should keep in consideration?

    PS: I am on the managing committee of this gated housing cluster (CHS or Co-operative housing society - as they are termed here) - As is often the case in such setups, the co-operative bit is almost an oxymoron and it's pretty much a thankless job

    I had half a mind to just hire an external agency to design and deploy this entire setup - but I also know that it would end up costing 2X + if not more.
    On the other hand, if I just need to buy the equipment and hire a civil contractor for the phyical setup, I would help save the community save a lot of funds from the common fund..

    At the same time, if I don't get this right, I also know that the list of folks complaining won't be small
    That's why I am hoping to get the design right upfront and hence all these questions
    Last edited by superczar; 09-14-2017 at 20:14.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by superczar View Post
    I wish I could buy you a beer!
    Oh, buy your kids an ice cream instead and enjoy their smile.

    So if I understand this correctly, the right way to go about it would be:

    1 - Server to Block A-B-C rooftop
    3 X pairs of CPE510 to get (hopefully) 70-80 mbps, max 100 at each block rooftop

    2 - Rooftop to Garden omni AP (1)

    Option A - Wired connection to one of the EAP 110s at one garden edge (preferred)

    Option B - Another pair of CPE510 to try avoid interference in the 2.4 Ghz band (backup option- This would mean a dependency on the house owner + the adjacent house to be OK with running a visible cable along his walls - Not a problem for the block I am in but would prefer to keep this option open just in case
    Yes, I would do it this way (but before doing final installation test it!):

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    Probably you don't need to mount the EAP110-Outdoor at the center of the garden - maybe you could mount it on the same pole as the CPE on the roof to also cover the garden. But this depends on the height of the buildings and distance to the garden. Do you want WiFi only in the garden or in the buildings around it, too? If in the buildings, why not equip them with indoor EAPs? Would simplify cabling, I guess.

    Another idea worth of consideration would be to mount the EAP110-Outdoor on the outside walls of the building, then for best coverage you would most certainly need two of them on either side of blocks B and C. Do a quick test with an EAP110-Outdoor to see wether it covers the area if mounted on the wall. You just need to supply power to it and then walking around with a laptop/smartphone equipped with a WiFi Analyzer (free app in Google's play store) to check for coverage and signal strength. You could alternatively use more sophisticated measuring software such as heatmap generators from Ekahau (Windoze) or Netspot (MacOS and Windoze). Those tools are not free, but very useful. There are even some free heatmap apps appearing on the play store, too, but I have not tested them yet, so cannot say wether they are worth a try.

    If you can manage to get CPE510 hardware version 1.x or - if allowed in your country - CPE520 any HW version, they have two Ethernet ports and PoE pass-through. So you could connect the EAP110-Outdoor directly with the CPEs and power up to two devices with one PoE injector (the one from the CPE). This would require just one cable running along the wall to a power socket/plug.

    Note, that the CPE510 HW V2 have only one Ethernet port and no more PoE pass-through, what means you would have to deploy two cables and connect them at the PoE injectors to connect EAP110-Outdoor with the CPEs.

    Forum member Carat1 did post a very nice picture of such a setup here: http://forum.tp-link.com/showthread....l=1#post214435

    3 - Garden Omni AP (2)

    Such a shame - The problem is running a cable from the first AP to the second is going to be very difficult since it would require digging up the pathways
    One possibility i can think of is to use a pair of cheap indoor AP (set to bridge) housed in an IP66 box next to the first and second AP (keeping them in 2.4G band ) and connect them wired via a switch (i.e incoming to AP 1 goes to switch first - then to the bridge AP and 1st EAP110 while the second bridge goes wired to second EAP110) - I understand this would affect throughput on the 2nd AP but the area is not going to be covered well by a single AP on the edge
    Are you sure the area is not covered by an EAP110-Outdoor alone? Did you try it already? If using 802.11n mode, mostly free LoS you should be able to cover an area at ~100m distance to the EAP110-Outdoor giving a 200m diameter around it.

    I also would first try mounting it on a wall of a house before considering to place it in the center of the gardens. Of course, an additional directional link to the center of the garden or its edges would be possible, too, but then I would use WBS210 and TL-ANT2410MO, which hopefully will be available soon, since it can be set to client mode with an AP (it's repeater mode) connecting to an EAP110-Outdoor set as an AP. Just exchange the roles - AP at the edge of the garden, client on the other side. Doesn't matter which one is AP or client for a wireless link.

    I guess there are no other alternatives really other than using this inelegant hack..
    Or are there any other Omni APs or outdoor mesh products (non TP-Link) that I should keep in consideration?
    Yes, there are some alternative variations which come to mind - for example an antenna pole at the edges of the area near the houses with free LoS to the server building for the CPEs and the EAP110-Outdoor near the ground or in only little height.

    Regarding mesh networks: I played around with 802.11s mesh a little, but never had it in production use, can't say anything about it. Maybe another forum member can add something to this, but you certainly would need a transfer network (often 5 GHz) and an user network (2.4 GHz).

    PS: I am on the managing committee of this gated housing cluster (CHS or Co-operative housing society - as they are termed here) - As is often the case in such setups, the co-operative bit is almost an oxymoron and it's pretty much a thankless job
    Just tell them they are responsible for the last mile.

    That's why I am hoping to get the design right upfront and hence all these questions
    Yes, but do tests before installing a final setup. Often there are alternatives coming up when testing which could not be planned before b/c of wrong assumptions. See, I once could manage to set up a radio link between a cheap, old-fashioned WRT54GL from Linksys with 7dBi high-gain antennas and a TL-ANT2424B 24 dBi antenna with a SOHO device on the other side over 600 meters with the WRT54GL even mounted indoor behind a window. I never would have believed that this works if told so, but it did. Small throughput only - 12 Mbit/s -, but it worked. Now imagine CPEs and EAP110-Outdoor - they will have significantly better throughput and coverage at 250x80 meters than any SOHO device!

    So, just try with two or three devices to get practical experience and then continue planning the whole installation. That's what I would do.
    Last edited by R1D2; 09-15-2017 at 01:19.

  7. #7
    Dear Customer,

    This is Bob from TP-Link Tech Support Team.

    According to your description and discussion, the networking requirement is for both camera and Wi-Fi coverage.

    I recommend to use CPE510 pairs for the wireless data link between server room and camera. Like Server Room---CPE510 )))((( CPE510 --- Camera

    And use this topology for Wi-Fi coverage in the garden: Server Room---CPE510 )))((( CPE510 --- EAP110-Outdoor

    You can set up several CPE510 upon the server room, the number of CPE510 depends on your camera's output video bit rate and the actual bandwith requirement for the Wi-Fi clients.

    Here are some points need to be noticed:

    (1) Before the actual deployment, we highly recommend to run a site survey to check the real coverage effect and run frequency spectrum scanning to choose a better channel with the lower noise.
    (2) The CPE510's theoretical PHY wireless speed can be up to 300Mbps. In your case, I recommend a P2MP topology, which means one CPE510 in the server room to connect with several terminal CPE510 which is connected to the camera or EAP110-Outdoor.
    But the specific number of CPE510 required will be confirmed through a site survey.

    (3) The EAP110-Outdoor is a 300Mbps 802.11n 2.4GHz Outdoor Wi-Fi product. The theoretical coverage range is about 200m, we recommend to it within 100m since you have said there are severe interference.
    And the recommended wireless client number for one EAP110-Outdoor is about 40, so about 3 EAP110-Outdoor can meet a max 150 clients use.

    (4)About the Wi-Fi coverage, if you just need to provide Wi-Fi for outdoor open space like the garden. EAP110-Outdoor can meet the requirement perfectly.
    If you need to provide Wi-Fi for the indoor environment like the surrounded building, we recommend to use indoor celling mount AP product like EAP225 or CAP1750
    (http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/d...92_EAP225.html http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/d...5_CAP1750.html)

    ----------------------------------
    Best Regards
    Bob

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Oh, buy your kids an ice cream instead and enjoy their smile.



    Yes, I would do it this way (but before doing final installation test it!):


    Probably you don't need to mount the EAP110-Outdoor at the center of the garden - maybe you could mount it on the same pole as the CPE on the roof to also cover the garden. But this depends on the height of the buildings and distance to the garden. Do you want WiFi only in the garden or in the buildings around it, too? If in the buildings, why not equip them with indoor EAPs? Would simplify cabling, I guess.

    You are right - I was somehow stuck on the notion of bringing the EAP110 on the ground level- Maybe the attached image may help visualise this
    The photo is of one block looking diagonally across from one corner.

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    Are you sure the area is not covered by an EAP110-Outdoor alone? Did you try it already? If using 802.11n mode, mostly free LoS you should be able to cover an area at ~100m distance to the EAP110-Outdoor giving a 200m diameter around it.

    I also would first try mounting it on a wall of a house before considering to place it in the center of the gardens. Of course, an additional directional link to the center of the garden or its edges would be possible, too, but then I would use WBS210 and TL-ANT2410MO, which hopefully will be available soon, since it can be set to client mode with an AP (it's repeater mode) connecting to an EAP110-Outdoor set as an AP. Just exchange the roles - AP at the edge of the garden, client on the other side. Doesn't matter which one is AP or client for a wireless link.
    I did not realize the EAP110 could cover those sort of distances
    Not sure but perhaps getting the 110s lower down on the house blocks may just about solve for the whole problem
    Based on your experience, what is the vertical beamwidth of the EAP110 - and what would you think be the appropriate placement location for the EAP110s?



    Yes, but do tests before installing a final setup. Often there are alternatives coming up when testing which could not be planned before b/c of wrong assumptions. See, I once could manage to set up a radio link between a cheap, old-fashioned WRT54GL from Linksys with 7dBi high-gain antennas and a TL-ANT2424B 24 dBi antenna with a SOHO device on the other side over 600 meters with the WRT54GL even mounted indoor behind a window. I never would have believed that this works if told so, but it did. Small throughput only - 12 Mbit/s -, but it worked. Now imagine CPEs and EAP110-Outdoor - they will have significantly better throughput and coverage at 250x80 meters than any SOHO device!
    Whoa - yes, I guess there are so many variables involved that many of our pre-conceived notions/assumptions can go flying out of the (aforementioned) window
    Let me start working with limited APs in testing mode to begin with and take it from there.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by superczar View Post
    Based on your experience, what is the vertical beamwidth of the EAP110 - and what would you think be the appropriate placement location for the EAP110s?
    Unfortunately there are no antenna patterns published for EAP110-Outdoor, but we cover a RV park with one CPE510/EAP110-Outdoor combination on the roof of a 2-story building (about 8-9 meter height) and another combination on an antenna pole of about 2.50m height in a distant blind spot 150m apart. Both WiFi cells cover an area of ~250x150 meters at least, partially overlapping. Works fine so far.

    On your photo above there are street lights in the garden area. I bet that there are cable ducts for power. Wouldn't this be an alternative for cabling as a last resort?

    But anyway, I suggest to first try to place the EAPs at the locations marked in your photo above.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Unfortunately there are no antenna patterns published for EAP110-Outdoor, but we cover a RV park with one CPE510/EAP110-Outdoor combination on the roof of a 2-story building (about 8-9 meter height) and another combination on an antenna pole of about 2.50m height in a distant blind spot 150m apart. Both WiFi cells cover an area of ~250x150 meters at least, partially overlapping. Works fine so far.

    On your photo above there are street lights in the garden area. I bet that there are cable ducts for power. Wouldn't this be an alternative for cabling as a last resort?

    But anyway, I suggest to first try to place the EAPs at the locations marked in your photo above.
    Ok, so based on the above it would appear one EAP110 per block should suffice.

    The good news first ..
    The other folks on the managing committee have also agreed to move ahead with this model
    Also, the local TP-link distributor has provided a fairly nice quote that undercuts online prices by quite a bit

    The not so good news is that I will have limited scope to return items (if needed) post a field survey - but I guess I can start with a lower sized order for one block and take it from there..

    Also, just thinking out aloud here but was just wondering if it is worth considering CPE210s in the mix as well (In case we get blind spots that do need coverage)

    i.e. either

    A) a CPE210 in wireless repeater mode mode to cover blind spots (although I wonder how would a CPE210 do it - given its directional nature would mean it would anyway point towards the area where the coverage is coming from

    B) CPE210 as bridge to connect another EAP110 to cover blind spots

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by superczar View Post
    A) a CPE210 in wireless repeater mode mode to cover blind spots (although I wonder how would a CPE210 do it - given its directional nature would mean it would anyway point towards the area where the coverage is coming from

    B) CPE210 as bridge to connect another EAP110 to cover blind spots
    Are you using CPE210 for the directional link? Wouldn't recommend this. Use CPE510 instead.

    CPE210's directional antennas have a beam width of 65 (H plane) / 35 (E plane), not well suited for omnidirectional coverage. Also keep in mind that repeater/bridge modes will cut maximum bandwidth by half. Personally, I avoid repeaters at all, we had have too much troubles with it.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    Are you using CPE210 for the directional link? Wouldn't recommend this. Use CPE510 instead.

    CPE210's directional antennas have a beam width of 65 (H plane) / 35 (E plane), not well suited for omnidirectional coverage. Also keep in mind that repeater/bridge modes will cut maximum bandwidth by half. Personally, I avoid repeaters at all, we had have too much troubles with it.
    No,the point to point links are CPE510.
    Only the last mile distribution is to be on 2.4Ghz.

    Since the CPE210 is advertised as 2X2 MIMO, I was (incorrectly) hoping that it probably is a dual radio that can work as a bridge-repeater.
    I guess this means that I will go ahead with the 3 sets of CPE510-CPE510-EAP110 combination (and 1 additional EAP110 wired at the central location).

    If in case we get blind spots, I suppose I will need to setup another set of 3 to eliminate that - Or alternatively a CPE210 near a blind spot in bridge mode to an active EAP110 and passing the distribution job to a EAP110

    Thanks once again for all the help

  13. #13
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    You're welcome.

    If you have deployed the network, please let the forum know wether it worked out for you.

    Have fun!

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    You're welcome.

    If you have deployed the network, please let the forum know wether it worked out for you.

    Have fun!
    Sure - Hoping to get it all done over the next weekend..
    Will keep the forum posted!

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by R1D2 View Post
    You're welcome.

    If you have deployed the network, please let the forum know wether it worked out for you.

    Have fun!
    So we did a trial run over the weekend and it worked as expected
    The 5ghz backhaul links are super stable with great throughput although the 2.4 coverage could have been a bit better (although it was to be expected given the noise in that band)
    All in all, it works fine ...

    Production deployment to be done over this weekend and probably next ...


    A few items are still outstanding

    1) What is the right power setting for a 100-150 m Point to point link (with clear LOS) for the CPE 510 .. AT the moment we tested it at the max setting (23dbm) but wondering if I should lower it down to reduce the noise floor for the other links?
    Or should I just leave it as is as the other links are set to different channels



    2) I was looking at the TP- Link ER5120 for the central router. While it is not really expensive, I am not sure if it is the right choice, esp since we don't have any WAN load balancing requirement
    Also wondering if it may be worth looking at a prosumer wireless router like Netgear R7000 or Archer C7 given the relatively modest traffic - I can switch off the wireless radio to use it as a wired router or maybe even keep radio on to improve coverage in the community center area...

    In any case, will keep the thread updated - Meanwhile any recommendations on the router are more than welcome
    Last edited by superczar; 09-25-2017 at 09:05.


 

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