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  1. #1

    Installation help using Mac iOS 10.12.6 Sierra

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    All -

    I have an existing WiFi Network using a cable modem and D Link 802.11 router. My goal is to expand the network outside of my home using the EAP110 Outdoor Access Point running in a client mode. I have seen comments on other posts that the EAP110 does not support "repeater" mode.

    The most immediate problem is not being able to find an installation guide specifically for the Mac iOS. I have downloaded the Unix file EAP_Controller_v2.4.8_Linux_x64.tar from the support TP Link website, but there does not appear to be an "auto install" routine attached to that file. When I open the "archive" file on the Mac, it does expand into many folders and files, but I do not see an installation or executable file. I have read the "readme" file, and it has a set of instructions for root commands, however the file name it is asking for (EAP_Controller_v2.4.8_Linux_x64.tar.gz) ends with ".gz" and that is not how it exists in my download.

    Am I missing something, or is there a more user friendly way to install the controller software on a Mac?

    Thanks for your help.

    Jim

  2. #2
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    First of all, you don't need the EAP Controller to install EAPs. The EAP Controller is a management utility for installations with many EAPs and it is currently available only for Linux and Windoze, not for MacOS (which is based on FreeBSD Unix, not Linux). You certainly don't need the EAP Controller for just one EAP.

    To set up your EAP110-Outdoor, connect it to your MacBook directly (don't connect it to a switch for now). Open Location -> Network Preferences in the Mac system menu and set an IP for the Ethernet interface from the subnet 192.168.0.0, for example set your MacBook to 192.168.0.12. Click Apply to activate this change. Then start a web browser and type in the address http://192.168.0.254. The EAP's web-based UI will be loaded. Log in using admin/admin for username/password. Now you can configure the EAP110-Outdoor to integrate it into your home network.

    I recommend to set the EAP to a static (fixed) IP from your home network, so that you later can connect to it without having to find out it's dynamic IP when connected to the switch. Remember to revert the MacBook's IP to either DHCP or the previous fixed IP after this change to be able to connect to the EAP with the new IP. As soon as you have configured the final IP for the EAP, you can connect it to your switch/router.

    BTW, this is documented in the Installation Guide and in the EAP User's Guide, the latter being available on TP-Link's website (see menu Support on the EAP110-Outdoor product page).

  3. #3
    R1D2 -

    Thank you for the reply. I think I have followed your advice and the installation guide that you referenced. My first attempt following your suggestion of connecting directly to the Mac did not seem to work because the ethernet port on the Mac did not seem to supply the POE requirement to power the EAP110. So, after reading the installation guide and just using my own reasoning, I established the network topology as outlined in the installation guide. Modem - to router - to switch - to EAP . I could then use the POE injector to supply power to the EAP.

    That allowed the EAP to show on the network with the default SSID "TP-LINK_2.4GHz/5GHz_XXXX". Following the instruction guide ... I logged in via Domain Name ... http://tplinkeap.net. as outlined on page 7. That enabled me to enter the default user name and password (admin / admin) and I could access the EAP. I then changed the SSID to the same name as the existing network, and set the security to WPA-PSK and assigned the same password as the existing network. The IP address was also changed to be within the same 192.168.1.XXX range as the existing D Link network router (but of course a different number). I saved all the changes and logged out.

    So the final result is I have one network SSID name, and two IP addresses on that same network, one of which is static 192.168.1.10 and the other which is set using DHCP but defaults to 192.168.1.100. The topography that I have is the EAP110 attached via cat5e cable to the switch built into the original D Link router.

    By running a command line "arp -a" on the Mac ... I can see the static IP and the corresponding mac address for the EAP, as well as the IP and mac addresses for what must be the primary router and modem.

    My question is: How can I tell if the network access points are "sharing" the responsibility for connection, or am I still just connected to the D Link router and the EAP is sitting idle. I have not set the EAP in its permanent position outside, so it is possible that my PC and other devices are just picking up the original connection. Is there a way for me to disconnect the cat5 cable from the switch and just run the POE injector into the EAP? Or have I really not set up the topography correctly and the fact that I have one SSID with two IP addresses not the correct way to lay this out?

    Suggestions and comments from all are appreciated.

    Jim

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbund View Post
    I think I have followed your advice and the installation guide that you referenced. My first attempt following your suggestion of connecting directly to the Mac did not seem to work because the ethernet port on the Mac did not seem to supply the POE requirement to power the EAP110.
    The Mac does not provide PoE, nor does it your router. The PoE adapter provides PoE and to connect any device directly, you have to connect it to the port labeled LAN on the PoE adapter! See the installation guide, it shows the scheme to connect any device to the EAP through the PoE adapter.

    I then changed the SSID to the same name as the existing network
    That's ok as final setting if you want "roaming" between your indoor and the outdoor WiFi. But for tests you should use another SSID, so you can be sure to be connected to the EAP110-Outdoor. If tests are done, you simply change the SSID back to the one used with the indoor WiFi.

    So the final result is I have one network SSID name, and two IP addresses on that same network, one of which is static 192.168.1.10 and the other which is set using DHCP but defaults to 192.168.1.100. The topography that I have is the EAP110 attached via cat5e cable to the switch built into the original D Link router.
    Not clear what you mean. The EAP110-Outdoor can have only one IP, either a static (fixed) IP assigned by you or a dynamic IP assigned by your router. It can not have two IPs at the same time.

    My question is: How can I tell if the network access points are "sharing" the responsibility for connection, or am I still just connected to the D Link router and the EAP is sitting idle.
    See above - you should use a different SSID while testing.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jbund View Post

    My question is: How can I tell if the network access points are "sharing" the responsibility for connection, or am I still just connected to the D Link router and the EAP is sitting idle. I have not set the EAP in its permanent position outside, so it is possible that my PC and other devices are just picking up the original connection.
    Hi Jim, As R1D2 said, you should set up a different SSID when giving a test. And if it works, you may change it into the same SSID as your main router and relocate. The obvious change is in the outside you can see a stronger DLINK SSID which is from EAP110-Outdoor. If you really want to know if which devices are connected to your router and which are connected to your EAP, you may just go to EAP's management page---Monitoring > Client page to see the clients info. Similarly, you can go to DLINK router management page and check the connected client list.

    Quote Originally Posted by jbund View Post
    Is there a way for me to disconnect the cat5 cable from the switch and just run the POE injector into the EAP?
    Actually, EAP110-Outdoor support passive PoE, and it can only be powered by its own PoE adapter. You can connect EAP110-Outdoor directly to DLink router instead of a switch as long as you have a long enough CAT5 cable. Please see the pic. Connect the right side Ethernet cable to your router.
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Carat1; 09-12-2017 at 01:50.

  6. #6
    OK -

    Thank you R1D2 and Carat! ...

    Starting over seems to have helped clear my thoughts, and get me a functional network. The solution was to set the existing "home" network to use DHCP, completely reset the EAP110 manually, then login to the EAP using the "open" EAP network rather than the existing "home" network, setup a user name and password, then change the SSID from the default "TP-LINK_2.4GHz/5GHz_XXXX", create a password, then submit changes. The changes would NOT happen unless I logged off the "TP-LINK_2.4GHz/5GHz_XXXX" network and logged into the existing "home" network. I suppose because I had changed the name of the network, it no longer was recognized on the Mac as a valid network, and would not transmit the changes to update the SSID properly. But I finally figured it out. I am sure there must have been another way. Now I can look for modifications and ask how to get there.

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    I am not sure if you can read the image, so I will attach it as well. The question is: Now that I have two "different SSID named" networks running from the same router, does the EAP110 support wireless connection to the router, or must I keep the Cat5e cable from the router/switch as shown in the diagram? When I have tested it by disconnecting the cable, the SSID name still shows up, but when I attempt to connect, the network connection fails and reports "No internet connection". I plug it back in, and it connects again after a minute or so. I am concerned that if I go back to assigning a static IP for one network, and DHCP for the other network, I will loose what I have gained. I am not sure that the Mac Sierra iOS supports "mixed" IP addressing, or perhaps I am just not setting it correctly. The Mac seems to handle all networks with one set of rules ... either static IP or DHCP assignment.

    Thanks again for your help and patience.

    Jim

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jbund View Post
    The question is: Now that I have two "different SSID named" networks running from the same router, does the EAP110 support wireless connection to the router, or must I keep the Cat5e cable from the router/switch as shown in the diagram?
    All EAPs can not be configured as a repeater or client. EAP110-Outdoor can only obtain Internet via an Ethernet cable connected to your router or switch. So just follow the layout you attached.

    And you are recommended to create a different SSID on EAP110-Outdoor in outside network. It is the router which acts as a DHCP server to assign a dynamic IPaddress to the EAP and your mac pro.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbund View Post
    I am concerned that if I go back to assigning a static IP for one network, and DHCP for the other network, I will loose what I have gained. I am not sure that the Mac Sierra iOS supports "mixed" IP addressing
    General rule: for stationary (non-mobile) devices use static IPs. There is no gain in using dynamic IPs for such devices. For mobile devices such as your MacBook or iPhone/iPad use dynamic IPs. The MacBook uses whatever you specify in the network settings menu (Apple menu -> Location -> Network Preferences). You even can create several different network profiles, that's the reason why this menu is called "Location": it lets you define different profiles/settings for different locations such as home, office, travelling etc. Thus, no matter wether the stationary devices such as the EAP, the switch and the router are set to static IPs you will additionally want to use dynamic IPs assigned by DHCP for all non-stationary (mobile) devices. That's the reason why a DHCP server should be present in your LAN. The wireless LAN is just part of your LAN despite the fact that you can use different SSIDs for indoor/outdoor - so it's just one big LAN.

    See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_address for more information about IP addresses and why they are needed for every device.
    Last edited by R1D2; 09-13-2017 at 12:37.

  9. #9
    Fair enough - consider the question answered. I will attach the EAP110 Outdoor via Cat5 cable to the switch as I have now.
    Thanks all.


 

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